WEBINAR SERIES

Experts from the Center for Violence Prevention regularly conduct free educational webinars on various topics related to youth violence prevention. The webinars are recorded and are available below. Sign up to receive alerts about upcoming violence prevention education webinars.

Please note that only those who attended the live presentations of these webinars are eligible for Continuing Education Credits.

Voilence prevention
Violence Prevention Education: "Behind the scenes" with the presenters from CVP's January 2020 webinar on domestic violence, guns, and children.

Recognizing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence in the Clinical Setting - May 2021

Teen Dating Violence (TDV) is a serious public health issue that is alarmingly widespread. While many people view intimate partner violence (IPV) as an adult problem, approximately 1 in 3 teens in the United States is a victim of TDV.

Like intimate partner violence among adults, TDV is a pattern of behaviors aimed to gain or maintain power or control over a current or former dating partner and includes physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse. However, unlike adult IPV, TDV incorporates the additional vulnerabilities of age and stage of life. If unaddressed, these foundational relationships can normalize unhealthy relationships and lead to a pattern of further abuse. Survivors of TDV experience higher rates of depression, substance abuse, suicide attempts, eating disorders, poor school performance, unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and future victimization.

This webinar educates pediatric providers so that they understand the issue of teen dating violence and know how to recognize it, how to help patients, and where to find resources.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Explain the issue of teen dating violence, how it differs from bullying and adult intimate partner violence, and the long-lasting impact on individuals
  • Understand how to recognize teen dating violence, how it can be addressed in a healthcare setting, and where to find information/resources
  • Identify the action steps for becoming a “Teen Dating Violence Prevention Champion” to help protect patients or caregivers experiencing TDV.
Webinar Resources

24/7 Hotlines

  • National DV Hotline: 1-800-799-7233, thehotline.org
  • Philadelphia DV Hotline: 1-866-723-3014
  • Love is Respect: chat online, call 866-331-9474, text LOVEIS to 22522

 

Online Resources

 

Philadelphia Resources

Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This 90-minute webinar was moderated by Rachel K. Myers, PhD, MS Violence Intervention Program Research Director and Research Scholar at CHOP's Center for Violence Prevention (CVP), Research Assistant Professor at The University of Pennsylvania's (Penn) Perelman School of Medicine. The presenters were Rachel K. MyersAmanda Lerman, MD, MSHP Attending Physician in the Division of Adolescent Medicine at CHOP; Christine Forke Young, PhD, MSN, CRNP Associate at CVP, Lecturer in the Department of Family & Community Health at Penn's School of Nursing, MPH Core Teaching Faculty at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, Associate Fellow at the Center for Public Health Initiatives at Penn, Fellow at the Ortner Center on Violence & Abuse at Penn; and Teresa Salinas, MSW, LSW Intimate Partner Violence Specialist at CVP and Medical Advocate at Lutheran Settlement House.

Domestic Violence, Guns, and Children: Putting Policies into Action - January 2020

In late 2018, Governor Wolf signed Act 79 into Pennsylvania law, mandating that those convicted of misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence, also known as intimate partner violence (IPV), or subject to final protection orders surrender their guns within 24 hours. This law also mandates that defendants surrender their firearms to specific authorities, rather than turn guns over to family members or friends.

This webinar provides education on the current policy landscape related to domestic violence and guns in the home, specifically focusing on Pennsylvania’s Act 79, and empowers pediatric care providers to support patient families who may be in crisis.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Mandates of PA Act 79 and where to find information/resources about it
  • Intimate partner violence, the overlap between domestic violence and child abuse, and how this topic can be addressed in a healthcare setting
  • The importance of understanding Act 79 to help protect families
Webinar Resources

CHOP Resources 

 

Local Philadelphia Resources 

 

Other Resources

Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This 90-minute webinar was moderated by Teresa Salinas, LSW, Medical Advocate at Lutheran Settlement House's Bilingual Domestic Violence Program and Intimate Partner Violence Specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia’s (CHOP) Violence Prevention Initiative, now Center for Violence Prevention. The presenters were Teresa Salinas; Rhona Gerber, MBA, Director of Development at CeaseFirePA; Eileen Horgan, Esq., Supervising Criminal Advocacy Attorney at Women Against Abuse; and Joanne Wood, MD, MSHP, CHOP Attending Physician, Research Director of Safe Place: Center for Child Protection and Health, Faculty Member at PolicyLab at CHOP, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

Crossroads of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Developmental Disabilities - March 2019

Recurrent or chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), which can lead to increased levels of toxic stress, can impair neurodevelopment, behavior, and overall health of a child (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012; Shonkoff & Garner, 2012). Healthcare providers, including physicians, nurses, social workers and other providers, are uniquely positioned to utilize ACEs screening to distinguish between developmental delays and symptoms of toxic stress, particularly among children with behavioral concerns, to guide and support patients both in direct care and advocacy roles (Girouard, 2017; Esden, 2018). Studies suggest low ACEs screening rates by providers in clinical practice (Kerker, Storfer-Isser, & Szilagyi, 2016; Tink et al, 2017). However, health professionals have cited unsatisfactory competence as one of the main barriers in work with ACEs, and requested more knowledge, training, and organizational resources on the topic (Albaek, Kinn, & Milde, 2018).

This webinar, hosted by Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), provides actionable information for physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, child life specialists, and other patient service providers.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Describe adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and their impact on behavior and development
  • Identify the overlap of signs, symptoms, and risk factors of ACEs and developmental disability
  • Explain how ACEs and developmental disabilities can be addressed in a healthcare setting
Webinar Resources

CHOP Resources

 

Local Philadelphia Resources

 

Other Resources

Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This 90-minute webinar was moderated by Patty Huang, MD Attending Physician within the Autism Integrated Care Program and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and a Senior Fellow at CHOP's Center for Injury Research and Prevention. The presenters were Roy Wade, Jr., MD, PhD, MPH, MSHP, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, General Pediatrician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and VPI Fellow; Amanda Bennett, MD, MPH, Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and a member of the Center for Autism Research team at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; and Sandhyaa Iyengar, MD FAAP, Fellow within the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Playing Catch-up -- How to Address the Lag in Reducing U.S. Child Mortality Rates - June 2018

A paper published in Health Affairs revealed that the United States lags behind all other wealthy nations in reducing its overall child mortality. In depth analysis by co-author, Dr. Christopher Forrest of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Applied Clinical Research Center in the Department of Pediatrics, and others pointed to three specific causes of child mortality responsible: preterm birth, fatal car crashes and gun assault deaths in youth ages 15-19 years old.

This webinar, hosted by Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), provides actionable information for health policy stakeholders, government agency staff, child health policy advocates, elected officials, and healthcare providers.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Identify the underlying causes of mortality in children under age 1 and adolescents 15-19 years
  • Discuss the three major contributing factors driving the lag in US child mortality rates
  • Discuss the evidence-based policies which should be implemented to address these issues
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This 90 minute webinar was presented by Christopher Forrest, MD, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and Health Care Management at CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania; Director of CHOP's Applied Clinical Research Center and moderated by Ahaviah Glaser, JD, Director of Government Affairs, External Affairs Department and Director of Health Policy for PolicyLab at CHOP.

A panel discussion was presented by Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, Senior Scientist and Director of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Center for Injury Research and Prevention at CHOP; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine; Master of Public Health Faculty; Michael L. Nance, MD, Director of the Pediatric Trauma Program at CHOP; Professor of Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine; and Scott Lorch, MD, MSCE, Attending Neonatalogist and Director of the Center for Perinatal and Pediatric Health Disparities Research at CHOP; Faculty member at PolicyLab at CHOP, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Impact on Providers, Patients and Families - January 2018

Working with ill and injured children and families, who are often traumatized, exposes providers to others' emotions and distress. When left unmanaged, this stress can take a toll on the provider - impacting their own health and well-being, as well as the care they are able to provide to patients and families. Stress related to the work of patient care may result in ‘secondary traumatic stress’ or related concerns like burnout or ‘compassion fatigue.’

This webinar provides actionable information for healthcare providers, psychologists, social workers, child life specialists, and other patient service providers.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Identify symptoms of secondary traumatic stress
  • Encourage proactive organizational support
  • Identify effective approaches for themselves and their colleagues to reduce stress associated with providing patient care
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This two hour session was presented by Kristen Kohser, MSW, LSW, Program Manager at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) at CHOP and Trainer for the Violence Prevention Initiative, now the Center for Violence Prevention (CVP); Carol Murray, MSS, MLSP, Training Manager at CIRP and Trainer for CVP; and Laura Vega, MSW, LCSW, Violence Prevention Supervisor for CVP's Violence Intervention Program. The moderator was Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, Associate Director for Behavioral Research at CIRP and Director of Training for CVP.

Human Trafficking in Adolescents - August 2017

Child sex trafficking, also known as commercial sexual exploitation or sex trafficking of minors, remains a complex and unaddressed form of violence against children and adolescents. It’s estimated there are approximately 100,000 victims and 300,000 youth at risk in the United States. Recognizing warning signs and identifying trafficked adolescents remains a challenge, in part due to myths about trafficking, its hidden nature, and the reluctance of adolescents to disclose abuse.

This interactive webinar hosted by CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative, now the Center for Violence Prevention, provides an overview of the complex issue of human trafficking in adolescents.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Define human trafficking and other related terms
  • Identify signs that your patient or client may be a trafficked youth Identify root causes of trafficking and transactional sex
  • Explore your role and responsibilities as a social worker
  • Identify resources to assist you with clients who are victims of trafficking
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

The two hour session was presented by Jasmine Oglesby, MSW, Prevention Case Manager for the Adolescent Initiative at CHOP and Erica Smith, MEd, Adolescent Case Manager for the Adolescent Initiative at CHOP and the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center. The moderator was Marné Castillo, PhD, MEd, Research Scientist in the Division of Adolescent Medicine at CHOP and Center for Violence Prevention Associate.

Intimate Partner Violence and Pediatrics - May 2017

Also known as domestic violence, intimate partner violence (IPV) is a widespread epidemic with an estimated 15.5 million children in the U.S. exposed annually to adult IPV at home. Established adverse effects of IPV on children and families include poor health, substance abuse, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms.

This interactive webinar from CHOP and Lutheran Settlement House (LSH) discusses IPV in the pediatric healthcare setting.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Define intimate partner violence (IPV)
  • Identify the effects of IPV on victims and their children Provide safe techniques for screening and documentation
  • Provide strategies to overcome barriers to screening and challenges of addressing IPV in the pediatric setting
  • Provide recommendations to establish referral and collaborative partnerships with IPV resources/providers in the community
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

The two hour session was presented by Ashlee Murray, MD, MPH, Attending Physician in the Emergency Department at CHOP and Fellow of CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI), now the Center for Violence Prevention (CVP); Marcella Nyachogo, LSW, Assistant Director of the Bilingual Domestic Violence Program at Lutheran Settlement House (LSH); and India Azzinaro, BSW, Medical Advocacy Supervisor at LSH and CHOP and CVP Practice-based Scholar. The moderator was Rachel Myers, PhD, MS, a Research Associate at CHOP's Center for Injury Research and Prevention and CVP Research Scholar.

Suicide Prevention in Children and Adolescents - November 2016

Suicide continues to be a leading cause of death among children and young adults, and recently released statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show an overall increase of suicide rates by 24 percent from 1999 to 2014 for all age groups under 75. Making mental health a routine topic during medical interactions is one way to begin to prevent youth suicide. Nearly 75 percent of adolescents have had contact with a medical professional within 4 months prior to committing suicide.

This webinar provides an overview of depression and suicide in children and adolescents, ways to screen children and teens in the emergency department and primary care, and best practices for follow up with patients to ensure they receive the appropriate mental health interventions.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Facts and statistics about suicide in children and adolescents
  • Universal screening practices in the emergency department and primary care
  • Practical strategies to start the conversation with patients
  • Best practices for follow up with patients to ensure they receive the appropriate mental health interventions
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

This webinar is presented by Jeremy Esposito, MD, MSEd Attending Physician in the Emergency Department at CHOP and Fellow of CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI), now the Center for Violence Prevention (CVP), and Anik Jhonsa, MD Attending Psychiatrist and Medical Director of Emergency Psychiatric Services at CHOP. The moderator was Flaura Winston, MD, PhD Attending Physician, Senior Advisor to CVP, and Founder and Scientific Director of the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at CHOP.

Counseling Families on Gun Safety in the Home - September 2015

Gun violence is a complex public health issue in the U.S., and those who counsel families about child access to guns in the home play a pivotal role in keeping children optimally safe. This webinar provides the information and practical strategies to address gun safety in the home to those in a position to counsel families about preventing child access to guns, including physicians, nurses, social workers, mental health professionals, educators, administrators, counselors, and others.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Facts and statistics about firearm injury among children and factors that place them at increased risk
  • Policy landscape related to the prevention of child access to guns
  • Appropriate ages and messages for anticipatory guidance
  • Practical strategies start the conversation with parents about safe storage of guns and ammunition
  • How to access resources on this topic
Webinar Moderator and Presenter Information

The webinar was presented by Michael Nance, MD, FACS, FAAP, CHOP Attending Surgeon and Director of the Pediatric Trauma Program and Mary Fabio, MD, FAAP, a General Practice Attending Physician at CHOP and Co-director of the Hospital’s Refugee Health Program. The moderator was Joel Fein, MD, MPH, an Attending Physician in CHOP’s Emergency Department and Co-director of CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative, now the Center for Violence Prevention.

Preventing Bullying and Empowering Teachers - February 2015

This webinar aimed at educators, administrators, and school counselors in elementary and middle school grades on a topic that is pervasive in school settings-- bullying.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.

Webinar Topics
  • Background information on bullying, how it is defined, forms (physical, social, cyber), roles (bully, victim, bystander), and impact on school climate
  • Best practice strategies for how teachers can help their students involved in ongoing conflicts and bullying
  • Approaches to enhance classroom climate in order to prevent bullying
  • Case examples to give practice in applying strategies covered
Webinar Resources
Webinar Presenter Information

This webinar was presented by CHOP's Violence Prevention Initiative's, now the Center for Violence Prevention, Stephen Leff, PhD and Christine Waanders, PhD.

An Introduction to the Delivery of Trauma-Informed Care in Medical and Mental Health Settings - June 2014

Watch an introductory webinar on trauma-informed care conducted by Meghan Marsac, PhD. Intended for pediatric healthcare providers, this webinar aims to educate viewers about how previous traumas can affect how children, families, and providers respond to treatment and outreach in clinical settings. Dr. Marsac offers examples of trauma-informed actions and suggests further training to help build the skills to put this into practice. For more information on trauma-informed care, click here.

Click here to access a PDF of the presentation slides.